Search
  • Giulia M

Cycling has a massively important role to play in creating net-zero cities, Oxford study says




We are all focused on dong better for our enviroment and we know every little helps. We came across this article today regarding an Oxford study and wanted to share it with you. Let's keep the world cycling!

  • Focusing solely on electric vehicles is slowing down the race to zero emissions, writes Oxford Professor Christian Brand.

  • If all new cars were electric from now, it would take 15-20 years to replace the world’s fossil fuel car fleet.

  • Electric cars aren’t truly zero-carbon as their batteries and manufacturing process produces emissions.

  • Emissions from cycling can be more than 30 times lower for each trip than driving a fossil fuel car and about ten times lower than driving an electric one.


Globally, only one in 50 new cars were fully electric in 2020, and one in 14 in the UK. Sounds impressive, but even if all new cars were electric now, it would still take 15-20 years to replace the world’s fossil fuel car fleet.

The emission savings from replacing all those internal combustion engines with zero-carbon alternatives will not feed in fast enough to make the necessary difference in the time we can spare: the next five years. Tackling the climate and air pollution crises requires curbing all motorised transport, particularly private cars, as quickly as possible. Focusing solely on electric vehicles is slowing down the race to zero emissions.


This is partly because electric cars aren’t truly zero-carbon – mining the raw materials for their batteries, manufacturing them and generating the electricity they run on produces emissions.

Transport is one of the most challenging sectors to decarbonise due to its heavy fossil fuel use and reliance on carbon-intensive infrastructure – such as roads, airports and the vehicles themselves - and the way it embeds car-dependent lifestyles. One way to reduce transport emissions relatively quickly, and potentially globally, is to swap cars for cycling, e-biking and walking – active travel, as it’s called.

Active travel is cheaper, healthier, better for the environment, and no slower on congested urban streets. So how much carbon can it save on a daily basis? And what is its role in reducing emissions from transport overall?

In new research, colleagues and I reveal that people who walk or cycle have lower carbon footprints from daily travel, including in cities where lots of people are already doing this. Despite the fact that some walking and cycling happens on top of motorised journeys instead of replacing them, more people switching to active travel would equate to lower carbon emissions from transport on a daily and trip-by-trip basis.

What a difference a trip makes

We observed around 4,000 people living in London, Antwerp, Barcelona, Vienna, Orebro, Rome and Zurich. Over a two-year period, our participants completed 10,000 travel diary entries which served as records of all the trips they made each day, whether going to work by train, taking the kids to school by car or riding the bus into town. For each trip, we calculated the carbon footprint.

Strikingly, people who cycled on a daily basis had 84% lower carbon emissions from all their daily travel than those who didn’t.


(Source: https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2021/04/cycling-electric-cars-net-zero-cities-climate-change?fbclid=IwAR0RWo7ldqNUcqowVk7VVIgwmiM56f6-vyvdQP0q_vhPXOXbOFbIAjN9i9M )



1 view0 comments

Recent Posts

See All